Isolation In Frankenstein

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Mary Shelley and her novel Frankenstein Mary Shelley’s classic novel Frankenstein tells the story of young scientist Victor Frankenstein and his pursuit to create life. Intrigued as a child with unconventional science, Frankenstein isolates himself from his friends and family because of his obsession. After many months collecting pieces of bone, muscle, and flesh from cadavers, Frankenstein sews each piece together forming a hideous monster. Before Frankenstein becomes aware of what he is doing, a bolt of lightning strikes and his creation comes to life. The appearance of the creature as well as the remarkable event that has just taken place overwhelm the scientist so much so that he flees from his apartment and immediately becomes ill with…show more content…
Frankenstein enjoys spending time alone in pursuit of his unconventional interests. The protagonist spends many hours in nature, and after the death of his mother is sent away to the University of Ingolstadt (Shelley 40). In Ingolstadt, Frankenstein is entranced by his work and obsession with creating life so much so that he does not venture out of his home or meet with colleagues. Throughout the novel, Frankenstein often chooses to spend time alone rather spending time with friends and family. While isolated, Frankenstein usually attempts to console himself over some experienced stress or to further pursue his intellectual interests, which in the novel lead to more traveling. Both Frankenstein and Shelley endure isolation whether by choice or force. Shelley is forced into isolation because of her romantic ventures and political beliefs. Her desire to live freely and maintain an open marriage with her husband, Percy Shelley leads to her isolation from society (Christ et al. 956). Though, like Frankenstein, there must be some element of enjoyment or peace which is retrieved from isolation, both Frankenstein and Shelley are able to be alone, or rather away from the influences of society, they are both more capable of expressing their true…show more content…
Shelley’s early childhood is mirrored in the experiences of Elizabeth Frankenstein, as well as the tragic deaths of both Elizabeth and Shelley’s mothers (Means 2). Shelley experienced isolation because of her interests and choices like Victor Frankenstein was isolated through his intellectual pursuits and ultimately through his obsession with destroying his monster (Ty). Finally, the concept of alienation was very familiar to Shelley because of her lifestyle, romantic pursuits, and political beliefs. Shelley and her husband Percy were ostracized from society for maintaining an open marriage and arguing against many conservative beliefs. Because Shelley was able to have such varied insight into her own life, she was able to interject these themes into one of the most valued works of literature in
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