Iroquois Kinship Essay

848 WordsFeb 15, 20124 Pages
Iroquois Kinship Organization Instructor Donna Hinsey December 19, 2011 Iroquois Kinship Organization Kinship is a connection by blood, marriage, or adoption. This is how each family is sorted out; the customs affect people’s behavior and people’s true behavior within parents and children. Iroquois kinship system is parental siblings of the same sex are blood relatives, parental siblings of different sex are aunt and uncle, mother’s sister is also called mother, father’s brother is also called father, mother’s brother is uncle, father’s sister is called aunt. Same sex parental children are siblings (parallel cousins), children of aunt and uncle are not siblings they are cousins (cross cousins). Iroquois marriage ego is encouraged to marry his cross cousin but cannot marry his parallel cousins. Iroquois blood lines are matrilineal traced through the mother. This means a child is the same clan and tribe as their mother no matter who the father is. If a child is born to an Oneida mother and an Onondaga father then the child is Oneida only. American culture parental siblings of the same sex are also blood relatives, parental siblings of different sex are aunt and uncle. We do not call our mother’s sister mother she is called aunt and our father’s brother is our uncle. Same sex parental children are siblings and aunt and uncle children are cousins. Clans are family grouping. This affects our behavior because you are not allowed to marry someone from your own clan even if they belong to a different nation for example a woman from wolf clan Mohawk nation could not marry a man from wolf clan Seneca nation. Clans sit together during ceremonies. Some of the sacred ceremonies include feather dances, drum dances, the rite of personal chant, and the bowl game and sun ceremonies. In American culture we do not have a specific clan or have sacred ceremonies. Iroquois comes

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