Irish Migration To America

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IRISH MIGRATION TO AMERICA 1846-1855 I am going to write about the migration of people between the years of 1846 to 1855. These years were largely known for the potato famine in Ireland. Migration is the movement of people; this is my presentation explaining some of the circumstances regarding the Irish migration to America. In this migration Ireland was the donor country and America being the receiving country. Beginning in 1845 and lasting for six years, the potato famine killed over a million men, women and children in Ireland and caused another million to flee the country. Ireland in the mid-1800s was an agricultural nation, populated by eight million persons who were among the poorest people in the western world. Only about quarter…show more content…
They thrived on the cool air and moist soil and by the 1800s potato was Ireland’s staple diet. It had become the staple crop in the poorest regions of Ireland. Potatoes provide protein, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins. Irish people could survive year after year and the people were sustained as long as the crop did not fail! The famine began in September 1845, it was an airborne fungus which killed the much needed crops and in turn caused the migration from Ireland. Throughout the famine years, nearly a million Irish arrived in the United States. Famine immigrants were the first big wave of poor refugees ever to arrive in the U.S. Just about all of the immigrants to America arrived by boat and ship. These ships were often referred to as “coffin ships” due to the poor condition and that a lot of the time when or if they made the 3000 mile journey they were saturated with disease and death. http://www1.assumption.edu/ahc/irish/Irish_emigrants_Mersey.jpgIrish immigrants boarding a “coffin ship” to America in…show more content…
This was the first hurdle the Irish had to face on their migration. When into America the Irish settled into the lowest rung of society and waged a daily battle for survival. Although this would have been a very hard way to make life better it was still better than being home where they would have surely died. In this sense it was a forced migration but as no one was physically moving them just life was getting made impossible by land and property owners because they were not getting their rent or dues because of the failed crop it could be seen as a volunteered migration. Mainly all of the immigrants that went to America settled in New York and Boston in the east but some did go further west to cities like Cincinnati, Chicago, and San Francisco. By 1850 the Irish immigrants made up 43% of the foreign born population in the whole of America. New York had more Irish born citizens than Dublin at this time which emphasises the large scale of this movement of
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