Injustice In African American Society

698 Words3 Pages
We all know what discrimination is, but most of us don’t know how it feels to be discriminated against. It is usually not until we go through something like this ourselves, that we begin to fully realize how cruel prejudice is. Throughout history, African-American people have experienced first hand how hurtful these practices can be. They have had to endure much suffering and negativity, before they were able to rise to the standing they have today in society. The first injustice to this race occurred when they were forced to be slaves. The Europeans, who settled in America in the 1600s, brought along the African black population as slaves. Slavery slowly rooted itself in the U.S. as the whites continued to establish themselves.…show more content…
However, racial discrimination continued after the war. The Southern legislatures, former confederates, passed laws known as the black codes, which severely limited the rights of blacks and segregated them from whites. They were separated in schools, theaters, taverns, and other public places. Congress quickly responded to these laws in 1866 and seized the initiative in remaking the south. Republicans wanted to ensure that while remaking the south, freed blacks were made viable members of society. The strong southern legislatures finally gave in, and in 1868 they repealed most of the laws that discriminated against…show more content…
entered WW II the south was a fully segregated society. Everything from schools, restaurants, hotels, train cars, waiting rooms, elevators, public bathrooms, colleges, hospitals, cemetery, swimming pools, drinking fountains, prisons, and even churches were for whites or blacks, but never for both. Segregation was supported by the legal system and police. But beyond the law there was always a threat by terrorist violence. The Ku Klux Klan, Knights of White Camellia, and other terrorists murdered thousands of blacks and some whites to prevent them from voting and participating in public life. The KKK was founded in 1865 to 1866. They directed their violence towards black landowners, politicians, and community leaders. They also did this to people who supported Republicans or racial equalities. Many Africans were brave and fought against this treatment. It was a response to all of the pandemonium happening. A few of these people were: Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Malcolm Little (also known as Malcolm X). These brave people helped end the segregation. They made people realize that the way whites treated blacks was wrong, and that there was a need for change. The Civil Rights Movement played a major role in making that change happen. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 officially banned
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