Indian Mascots

1932 Words8 Pages
There is no definition for an Indian, however, “most tribes follow former federal mandates and require a certain amount of Indian blood, often called blood quantum, for membership” (A Brief Historical 143). Besides tribes there are other entities that are in charge to determine who is not member. As example there is the US Census Bureau states that “an Indian is anyone who declares himself or herself to be an Indian” (A Brief Historical 144), but the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) generally characterizes an Indian as “an individual who is a member of an Indian tribe, band or community that is officially recognized by the federal government” (A Brief History 144). Nowadays, in general, there are three types of Indians, those who belong to federally-recognized…show more content…
They also changed their symbols to non-offensive ones. Since 1988, students from the University of Illinois, conduct a continuous struggle against the governor of the Board of Trustees in order to change the dancing Indian mascot of the University to a neutral one. There seems to be little chance to achieve a favorable result in this matter. In recent times significant steps have been made in the matter. Around 6 universities changed their names and besides this the Los Angeles Board of Education voted to ban the Indian images and names (Teters 5).There are still ongoing protest and their motto is that “American Indians are a People, Not Mascots for Americas fun and games. We are human beings” (Teters…show more content…
The Act passed by the congress promised “to protect and preserve for American Indians their inherent right of freedom to believe, express and exercise their traditional religions, including but not limited to access to sites, use and possession of sacred objects and the freedom to worship through ceremonies and traditional rites” (A Brief Historical 104). The year1988 brought the trial of Lyng vs. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association, the Indians arguing that “the building of a logging road in the Six Rivers National Forest would bring irreparable damage to their sacred sites” (A Brief Historical 105). The lover courts injunction against building the road was overturned by the Supreme Court thus they allowed its construction, but the road, fortunately never was
Open Document