Importance Of Carnival In The Classroom

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The teacher represents authority and knowledge, something which automatically places the teacher in a “higher” standing, set apart and above, socially, from the students. In the system, teacher and students occupy separate spheres. However, the carnival marketplace seeks to eradicate the boundaries of social spheres, and establish a safe platform for interaction and shared common goals—learning and proficiency. To establish this marketplace and for teach and student to reach an identity of sameness, the lives of the students but be freed within the carnival which “breaks down distance and suspends social immobility and barriers” (Tam 4). It is not enough to say the classroom is a marketplace. It must be established through aspects of…show more content…
They are naturally curious about sex, body, and taboo subjects. Many classrooms attempt to subvert this aspect of the teenage life, but the carnival in the classroom would have a place for it—it must have a place for it. Caroline Shields, in her book, Good Intentions Are Not Enough: Transformative Leadership for Communities of Difference, describes how in many schools, “those in power often take steps to organize the existing structures to exclude diverse voices and perspectives” and that “Rather than organize to emphasize and encourage participation…, many schools find ways to discourage discussion on controversial topics” (183). Schools are making the “assumption that people have equal access and opportunities to voice their opinions and that those who choose not to exercise that right do so out of informed choice.” They assume that students and even their parents are uninvolved and lack achievement simply because they are disinterested and unmotivated (Shields, 183). However, Shields suggest that it is because they have no voice, no power within a “typical school organized in hierarchical and uniform lines according to what has become known as the “factory model” of organizational life” (183). However, a school “planned around a series of innovations in governance as well as in teaching and learning, intended to meet diverse learner needs… represents a sort of educational carnival” and “as…show more content…
“Powerless people, Kincheloe and Steinberg suggest, have little opportunity to develop their talents throughout their lives, little autonomy to act outside the authority of professionals, and “little hope of being taken seriously, of being listened to with respect, of being treated with dignity” (1997,96)” (Shields 195). Giving students power by opening up non-traditional avenues of discussion in the texts and in the classroom will inspire students to look at learning in a new
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