Immigration Unstoppable Disease Summary

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Immigration: an unstoppable disease? Patrick J. Buchanan is a respected journalist who points out the growing concern about immigration in the United States. In his own words, “the America of our grandchildren will be another country altogether… a giant Brazil of the North.” The rapid growth in America has brought to it a giant wave of immigrants who not only bring their customs but also their own way of life. Buchanan offers several reasons for which we should be worried; explaining why America is losing its heritage and most importantly it’s identity as a country. During the Cold War era, many Americans stood together under one common belief: communism is bad. Everything revolved around that one ideal. People grew united and fought…show more content…
With this said, Buchanan believes that by 2050 there will be three times the population that there was in the ‘60s – 420 million. Immigration as intimidating as it may sound does not pose a threat to a country that has been inhabited by people all over the world long ago before the Immigration Act was passed in 1965. The US has a long history of rich culture and diversity, and even though Buchanan emphasizes that the US is losing its culture, it has in fact been enriching it for a very long time. As words are replaced in every-day vocabulary, so are the customs and the way of living of a population. It is also irrelevant whether the size of the population increments or not as long as old- day traditions are preserved. As long as America is willing to teach and preserve its traditions there is nothing to worry about because there will always be something to look up to, that is what I…show more content…
Democracy slowly disappears when decisions are carried out mostly by corporate and managerial elite- says Buchanan. Decisions are to the benefit of its people; elites can only control society up to a point. Even with this basic control over society, it is hard to send undocumented people back to their countries of origin when they have been living in that land for many generations; in other words, they have become Americans. Society is managed through several aspects whether corporate rule or through popular demand; it is impossible to solely blame elites for the rapid decay of American culture; society simply changes and so do its
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