Illness In Prisons

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Mental Illness in Correctional Facilities: In 2012, there were an estimate 356,268 inmates with severe mental illness in prisons and jails across the United States. There are 2.4 million people in 1,719 state prisons, 102 federal prisons, 2,259 juvenile correctional facilities, 3,283 local jails, and 79 Indian Country jails as well as in military prisons, immigration detention facilities, civil commitment centers, and prisons in the U.S. territories. The mental health inmates take up a pretty big statistic out of the 2.4 million incarcerated prisoners. Researching this issue has led all the way back to colonial America and the history from then until present day, also has led to the legal background for treating mentally ill inmates, and…show more content…
These voices vocalizing the problem led directly to the Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia in 1752 to admit its first “lunatics” to what eventually would be known as the nation’s first psychiatric ward. The next step was when Virginia Governor Francis Fauquier authorized the building in Williamsburg of the nation’s first psychiatric hospital exclusively for the insane in 1773. Through the 1800’s up until the 1960’s seemed to be going well. Many mental hospitals were opened throughout the country and proper treatment was being given, for the most part. Even though it was better during this time period, patients were treated poorly and abused any many of these hospitals, but most mentally ill patients were staying out of prison and jails. This all began to change with the emptying of the state mental hospitals in the 1960’s. This is widely referred to as deinstitutionalization, this was probably the most well-meaning but poorly planned medical-social policy of the twentieth century America. Many patients discharged were not given follow ups and all psychiatric care had been taken away from them. These patients…show more content…
If the entry of persons exhibiting mentally disordered behavior into the mental health system of social control is impeded, community pressure will force them into the criminal justice system of social control. Further, if the mental health system is forced to release mentally disordered persons into the community prematurely, there will be an increase in pressure for use of the criminal justice system to reinstitutionalize them. . . . Those who castigate institutional psychiatry for its present and past deficiencies may be quite ignorant of what occurs when mentally disordered patients are forced into the criminal justice
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