Hypertension In African Americans

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Abstract Hypertension in African Americans is a major clinical and public health problem because of the high dominance and premature onset of high blood pressure (BP) as well as the great burden of deadly factors that lead to conditions such as obesity and diabetes mellitus. BP control rates are lower in African Americans, especially men, than in other major ethnicity-sex groups; overall control rates are 29.9%for non-Hispanic Black men. (CDC, 2002) The best antihypertensive treatment requires a comprehensive approach that is surrounded by different lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, salt and alcohol restriction, and increased physical activity plus drug therapy. The most important step in the evaluation of patients with high blood…show more content…
(Burt VL, Whelton P, Roccella EJ, et al, 1995) In this study I found that women have higher odds of reporting hypertension than do men, regardless of their race/ethnicity. Women are more likely to access the medical system and live longer than men. Thus, it is possible that women are more likely to be aware of their hypertension status because of their contacts with physicians. Evidence suggests that the prevalence of hypertension decreases as education increases among non-Hispanic Blacks and Whites, but not among Mexican Americans. (Borrell LN, 2006) Compared with non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks regardless of their education were more likely to report hypertension, with those with a college degree or more having the greater odds. By contrast, Hispanic Whites with at least some college were less likely to report having hypertension than were non-Hispanic Whites, with Hispanic Whites with less than a high school education having the lower…show more content…
The overall prevalence of self-reported hypertension was 24.4%, with lower prevalence amongst Hispanics than among non-Hispanics. In general, although Blacks had the highest prevalence of hypertension, the prevalence estimates were also higher in non-Hispanic Blacks. Hispanic Blacks who had a college degree or more and those with less than a high school diploma had similar prevalence of hypertension. Also Blacks with an income of $55 000 or more had a higher prevalence of hypertension than Whites regardless of their
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