Hurricane Related Text

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Comparably to The story of Tom Brennan whereby the protagonist fails to adapt to his new paradigm due to immense social and emotional barriers, Norman Jewison’s biographical film The Hurricane demonstrates that coming in terms with inner fear and anxiety allows one to overcome the emotional barriers and enter into a new world that affords a greater self. The protagonist ‘Hurricane Carter’ is an infamous African-American boxer who faces a corrupt world of racial prejudice. He faces an unprecedented calamity of imprisonment due to false allegations of homicide. The close-up shots of his blood-teary eyes conveys an intense thirst for vengeance. Similarly to Tom Brennan, this leads him to face immense psychological barriers such as schizophrenia, fear and antisocialism, which accordingly breeds his hatred and hinders his transition to adapt to his new world. The high angle shot belittles him within his dark prison cell, and the panorama shot of the penitentiary evokes his immense suffering and the loss of his sense of identity. Additionally, the nondiegetic crescendo of adrenaline-inducing instrumentals creates a chaotic atmosphere which effectively exudes the inner agonies of a broken man who is left with nothing. In such ways, the initial stages of the film evince the protagonist’s unwillingness to accept his new world and conveys his refusal to seek companionship. Comparably to The story of Tom Brennan whereby the protagonist fails to adapt to his new paradigm due to immense social and emotional barriers, Norman Jewison’s biographical film The Hurricane demonstrates that coming in terms with inner fear and anxiety allows one to overcome the emotional barriers and enter into a new world that affords a greater self. The protagonist ‘Hurricane Carter’ is an infamous African-American boxer who faces a corrupt world of racial prejudice. He faces an unprecedented calamity

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