Huckleberry Finn Conscience

988 Words4 Pages
All right, then, I’ll go to hell’ – and tore it up,” (Twain 215). These words have become forever immortalized in American literature, thank to the author Mark Twain, writer of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The novel takes place in a critical point during American history, when slavery ruled all, including society. The novel follows a white southern boy, Huck Finn, and Jim, an African American man, on their adventures through slave country. Both are running for freedom on the Mississippi River. Huck constantly has to deal with an internal conflict between his corrupt conscience and true heart. Throughout the novel society proves to symbolize the corrupt conscience, while Huck represents the true heart. Huck’s…show more content…
As a southern white boy, Huck has an obligation to turn Jim back in; when he does not he is essentially turning his back on society.”’People would call me a low down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum - but that don’t make no difference. I ain’t a-going to tell . . .’” (50). Huck is aware that by not turning Jim in he is not only putting himself at risk for ridicule from his peers but, also breaking the law. Yet, he still promises that he will help protect Jim and keep his secret. In fact, not too long after he makes his promise, he is put to the test again.”I begun to get it through my head that he was most free-and who was to blame for it? Why, me . . . conscience up and says . . . ‘you knowed he was running for his freedom, and you could ‘a’ paddled ashore and told somebody’”…show more content…
The Duke and King end up selling Jim back into slavery. Huck has to choose between helping Jim escape or accept the fact that he will remain in slavery. If Huck had been full product of his society, then he would have had no problem leaving Jim. Instead, for more than six pages Huck contemplates with himself about what should be done. On one hand, society says that it would be wrong for a white to help a black slave. “. . . people that acts as I’d been acting about that [black] goes to everlasting fire.” (214). According to society, he would be committing some great travesty against travesty against God and end u spending the rest of his internal life in hell for helping an enslaved black man. On the other hand, Huck knows that Jim has always been there for him. To Huck, Jim represents a father figure, and although he comes close to writing back home and turning Jim in, he doesn’t. Just before he is about to send it, he starts to remember about Jim and everything that they have been through together.”’I couldn’t seem to strike no places to harden me against him . . . I was the best friend old Jim ever had in the world, and the only one he’s got now . . .’”(215). The two had formed a relationship, considered, at the time, to be wrong and
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