How Sharecropping Stop African Americans

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History Internal Assessment Rofiat Akindele Plan of investigation 1 Summary of evidence 2 2.1 economic reasons African Americans move south to the North . . . . …………………….…. 2 2.2 How sharecropping stop African Americans from improving the conditions of their life.....2-3 2.3 types (level) of jobs did African Americans have in the 1930’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ………3 2.4 Reality of Life in the South………………………………………………… . . . . …. . . …. .4 2.5 The Great Migration and its Impacts on US Cities and…show more content…
1 Plan of investigation ------------------------------------------------- This investigation will assess the significance of. What economic reasons led African Americans to move from the South to the North. The Investigation will connect. How did sharecropping stop African Americans from improving the conditions of their life? The investigation will access what types (level) of jobs did African Americans have in the 1930’s? Also the investigation will list three reasons why the North was a better place for African Americans to live? The investigation will discuss The Great Migration and its Impacts on US Cities and Suburbs. 2 Summary of evidence 2.1 What economic reasons led African Americans to move from the South to the…show more content…
Before World War I began in 1914, few African Americans were economically prosperous. The majority of northern blacks were manual Laborers, domestic servants, or both. In the South, most blacks were sharecropping farmers, manual Laborers and domestic servants. This changed with the start of WWI. The flow of European immigrants To the United States was halted. As a result, there were fewer immigrants to fill lower level manufacturing jobs, so northern manufacturers dropped their race biases and hired African Americans for the first time. It is estimated that 400,000 African Americans took manufacturing jobs in northern Cities before the end of World War I. A second factor contributing to migration was that wages in the North were higher than the agriculturally based wages in the South. When word of this traveled south, many blacks made the Decision to leave. A third economic factor contributing to the Great Migration was the series of Economic setbacks prior to World War I that hit southern farmers hard. All of this destruction resulted in poor crop returns for farmers. As a result, land owners tightened credit making it even more difficult for black sharecroppers to break even. When banks began to fold and Loans became impossible to secure, farm owners were forced to sell their land at low prices. This put Tenants in an even worse situation of limited advances of food and clothing, while increasing the already High
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