Masculinityment In Arthur Salesman's Death Of A Salesman

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How is the theme of masculinity explored in the Death of a Salesman? The theme of masculinity is explored broadly throughout Death of a Salesman. The most obvious reason is that the setting took place male dominant family within a male dominant society. Through the character, Linda, the reader will see the subordinate role of women at that time, while men are considered to be superior, in this case, Willy. Willy and Happy’s view of women as sexual objects also displays masculinity. Biff’s view of women is not as inferior as what Willy and Happy thinks, though he sees the male gender as the working force and ought to do physical work, which shows that he sees the female gender as being ‘anemic’ and weak. The representation of female characters…show more content…
The reader was told that “sexuality is like a visible colour on [him]” in the beginning. This statement was proven when he admits to his unhappiness to Biff. He confessed that “whenever he feels disgusted”, he sleeps with women. In addition, he describes sex “like bowling” and “[he] just keep knocking them over”. In this sense, Happy treats women like objects, i.e. bowling pins and that they ought to bring joy to men when they’re feeling down. This behavior shows Happy’s masculinity. While men can use women to treat themselves a moment of joy, women cannot, which shows a superiority in the male gender. In addition, the way that Happy is actually unhappy creates a dramatic irony as his emotions opposes his name. However, it also shows a similarity between Happy and Willy as both of them had sexual affairs with other women and their views of women as objects are the…show more content…
He has always “desired to be [in the] outdoors because he loved nature and likes showing physical strength. He believes that “men built like us should be working out in the open to “use our muscles” as if females are incapable to do perform physical works themselves. Willy, on the other hand, shows clear distaste for manual labor when Biff speaks of it because he only cares about how much Biff earns. This shows a contrast yet also a similarity between the father and son. Biff’s view of his career is by the joy given by the work, instead of the income of the work. However both of them pursued their dreams as both yearn for successes. Their motivations of showing their worth explore the theme of
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