How Far Do You Agree That Garibaldi’s Intervention in Sicily and Naples Was the Decisive Turning Point in the Unification of Italy in the Years 1848-70? Essay

686 WordsNov 21, 20143 Pages
How far do you agree that Garibaldi’s intervention in Sicily and Naples was the decisive turning point in the unification of Italy in the years 1848-70? Garibaldi was originally a guerrilla fighter and played a large role in the unification of Italy. He, along with Camillo Cavour, Victor Emmanuel II and Giuseppe Mazzini are all considered nowadays as the Fathers of Italy, and I will be assessing if Garibaldi’s intervention in Sicily and Naples was the decisive turning point in the unification of Italy in the given time period, I will also give counter arguments to the statement given in the question by giving and explaining other examples of events which can be considered as turning points in the process of unification. These are events such as the roles played by foreign powers, these are the likes of France and Austria, and the events include the secret Plombiéres meeting between Cavour and Napoleon of 1858, the France Prussian war, Napoleon becoming Emperor of France in 1852, the Crimean war, Cavour’s appointment and the Orsini Affair. Garibaldi was very much a reactionist rather than a clever politician; he relied on brute force and did not plan his actions very efficiently, but this did not make him a bad leader, his strategy in most cases was to deny the enemy a moment’s pause, and this enemy was a common enemy of many of the inhabitants of the Italian peninsula, Austria. Throughout the 19th Century Austria had been inhibiting the reality of a unified Italy as they quelled revolutions and halted protests with strength and political dominance throughout Europe. After a very strong campaign throughout the south of Sicily he moved up through Calabria and on the 7th of September 1860, he entered Naples which was the peninsulas largest city, he then proclaimed himself “Dictator of the Two Sicilies”. At first, Garibaldi was sympathetic to the aims of the
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