How Does Woolf Present Peter Walsh’s Inner Though Essay

828 WordsDec 28, 20114 Pages
How does Woolf present Peter Walsh’s inner thoughts, how convincing is she at creating his inner life ? When we are first introduced to Peter Walsh it is through Clarissa Dalloway thoughts, we get the impression he is controlling and self-centred and we come to the conclusion that they never got married because of this reason. Dalloway introduces us to Peter Walsh when he comes back from his five year trip to India, his thoughts start off about Clarissa aging, he seems to want to tell her that she has aged but decides against it ‘I shant tell her’. He then feels somewhat embarrassed when he notices Clarissa is looking at him, he tries to act normal by bringing out a pen knife and half opening it, this reaction seems weird but Dalloway makes it known to us through Clarissa that this was a habit of Walsh. Peter Walsh criticizes Clarissa, becoming irritated and agitated as he thinks about the time he’s spent in India and she is ‘playing about, going to parties, he then has a misogynistic view about women in marriage referring to Clarissas husband, Richard as the conservative kind. Sitting in the room with Clarissa, Walshs mind flickers back and forth from the past, Woolf makes the atmosphere between them seem a little bit awkward, and he blames Clarissa for making him remember, for torturing him so infernally. Woolf gives us the impression that he is a bit self-conscious; Walsh compares and criticizes himself to Clarissas life, declaring himself a failure as these thoughts run through his mind, he again brings out his knife. Woolf shows us the emotional side of Walsh when asked about his life, he tries to be egoistic talking about his adventurous time in India, his new love when he is suddenly overwhelmed and he bursts into tears, we feel some sort of sympathy towards Peter those few moments but it is gone quickly when after comforted by Clarissa he storms out of

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