How Did The Plains Indians Fight In The Great Plains

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The U.S. Cavalry action in the Great Plains developed after the Federal Indian Policy and other Treaties were disregarded to suit the needs of the white mans lust for the west. The purpose of my paper will show how the Plains Indians were stripped of their lands, livelihood, and forced to live on reservations by the U.S. Cavalry. It will cover the white migration to the west coast, gold discovery in the Black Hills, Northern Pacific Railroad through Sioux territory, slaughter of the buffalo, and the Ghost Dance. During the 1830s, the United States government adopted the Federal Indian Policy that forced the Eastern tribes to be moved west of Missouri to resettle on land then scorned as “the Great American Desert” unsuitable for white habitation…show more content…
The Cheyenne’s in the North were helping Red Clouds Sioux fight against traffic on the Bozeman Trail. They also participated in the slaughter of Caption Tetterman’s detachment on the Bozeman Trail. General William T. Sherman said after the slaughter that 50 Plains Indians could “checkmate” 3,000 soldiers. General Philip Sheridan calculated that the Army suffered proportionately greater losses fighting Indians than either the Union or the Confederacy had suffered in the Civil War. With the Army unable to defeat the Sioux and their allies, a Federal Peace Commission in 1868 negotiated the second Treaty of Fort Laramie. The United States abandoned the Bozeman Trail and other routes and military posts on Sioux territory. They also guaranteed the Sioux perminate ownership of the Black Hills of South Dakota, and the right to live and hunt in the Powder River country in Wyoming and Montana (Reedstrom, Lisle E., Custer’s 7th…show more content…
Ignoring orders to wait, he decided to attack before they could alert the warriors in the village, which numbers three times his strength. Dividing his forces in three, Custer sent Captain Benteen to prevent their escape through the upper valley of the Little Bighorn River. Major Reno was to pursue the group and charge the village in a coordinated effort with the remaining troops under Custer’s command. Reno’s squad attacked the northern end, but got overwhelmed and retreated uphill to the e bluffs east of the river. Custer entered the village from the other end with 210 men, taking the pressure off of Reno’s men. The Indians crossed the river and forced Custer back to a long high ridge to the north. Meanwhile. another force, largely Oglala Sioux under Crazy Horse’s command, swiftly moved down stream and doubled back and surrounded Custer and his men. Custer ordered his men to shot their horses to form a wall, but it didn’t stop the bullets. In less than one hour, Custer and his 210 men were killed. After another days fighting, Reno and Benteen’s united force escaped when the Indians stop fighting (Battle of the Little Bighorn.
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