How Did Mary Queen Of Scots Influence Elizabeth I's Authority

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Short-Term Impact of Mary Queen of Scots on Elizabeth I's Authority Royal houses and life at court in general is not without its series of struggles ranging from power, influence, wealth, and of course, ascension to the throne. Queen Elizabeth I, the last of the European house Tudor, has an intriguing and colorful ancestry considering that she was the offspring of the second marriage of Henry VIII. Henry VIII legitimized the annulment of his first marriage so that he could marry Anne Boleyn, a royal courtier, who borne him Elizabeth. Elizabeth's rise to the throne was filled with many intrigues and political machinations that continued well into her reign as monarch of England. If it is commonly expected for relations to help one another…show more content…
Elizabeth and Mary each had their sets of loyal supporters, organized mainly according to religious views. Elizabeth had the backing of the Protestants of which she was the acknowledged leader, and Mary had the support of the Roman Catholics, the largest Church in Europe and undoubtedly powerful during those times. Most monarchs would want the Church’s approval in order for them to legitimize their rule but Elizabeth took after his father and preferred to uphold the authority of the Church of England. In spite of the tragic direction that the relationship between Elizabeth and Mary took, it cannot be denied that the latter significantly impact the authority of Elizabeth. Due to her experiences involving Mary, Elizabeth became known as a firm and fair Protestant ruler who also became cautious in terms of foreign affairs. Combined, it is believed that these factors contributed to the strength in Elizabeth I’s authority such that her reign provided much-needed stability to England. Firm but Fair Protestant…show more content…
She was convinced that she had more right to rule over England compared to Elizabeth. Mary was the granddaughter of Henry VIII’s older sister, while Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, a union that was much criticized as illegal and immoral. Elizabeth suggested that Mary marry Lord Robert Dudley and become heir to Elizabeth (who never married and was thus childless). Instead, Mary entered into a series of impetuous romantic relationships, starting with Lord Darnley; her secretary David Rizzio, and James Hepburn, Earl of Bothwell who was suspected of killing Darnley. As a result of these romantic relationships, Mary had to abdicate her crown in favor of her young son, and flee to England. There, Elizabeth absolved her of murder charges but for almost 20 years, Mary purportedly plotted to wrest the crown from Elizabeth. Each and every plot was discovered and
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