Holocaust Psychological Effects

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Psychological Effects of Holocaust According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, holocaust is defined as “A sacrifice consumed by fire.” This has an eerie relation to the suffering that millions of Jews faced during the Holocaust of World War Two. Even though the war ended sixty-six years ago, the effects are still felt today. The long term effects of the Holocaust are numerous and still showing effects and will be for the unforeseeable future. The Holocaust beginnings of the Holocaust began in Germany in 1933. According to The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, “The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of approximately six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators.” The Nazis…show more content…
Ghettos were also formed to monitor the Jewish population, which were enclosed city districts which the Germans concentrated the Jews. On May 7, 1945 the German armed forces surrendered to the Allies. The next day was the official end of the war, also called V-E Day. Many of the survivors of the Holocaust, who were left with nothing, went to displaced persons camps set up by the Allied powers. “The crimes committed during the Holocaust devastated most European Jewish communities and eliminated hundreds of Jewish communities in occupied eastern Europe entirely.” (United States Holocaust Memorial Museum) There have been several attempts to measure the effects of the Holocaust. The most researched and measured effects are the psychological effects the Holocaust had on its survivors. “Clinicians made pessimistic predictions when they first began seeing Holocaust survivors as patients” (Baron and Scuello 513). After liberation survivors were left with nothing. Most of their families had been killed, and their property taken from them. Unable to fully comprehend their tragedy or to express grief or rage, the survivors still had to undertake the task of rebuilding their…show more content…
According to a study done by Sarah Bender, her father being a second generation Holocaust survivor, shared a focus on socioeconomic status, which was passed from his father. In her study she stated, “The importance of having grandparents for the third generation is prevalent theme for many second generations.” (210) The third generation also has reported effects. Bender reports that themes found in the third generation “were relevant to my life include close family ties, transmission of family values, avoidance of the Holocaust subject, and emotionally difficulty with the Holocaust.” (211) According to research, the Holocaust was a topic that was not talked about openly. These effects are still being felt by generations today, who feel the need to never forget the Holocaust. The Holocaust is one of our darkest times in history. Around six million people were killed. The effect have been measured, studied, and recorded since the wars end in 1945. Even though the even happened over fifty years ago, the effects are still being felt today. The psychological effects, their attitudes towards food, the occurrence of survivor syndrome, or the effects on the next generations are only a few of the many reported effects. There was a common theme in their research, and it was the idea that we much never for get what
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