Holden's Economic Issues

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Newcastle herald 23rd march 2013, More mining jobs axed, Whitehaven coal laid off 40 workers in NSW to deal with lower coal prices. The company lost $47 million in the first half of the financial year and is expected to be the same in the second half. As prices aren’t lowering and they are still trying to find ways to save money, more jobs will be redundant.800 workers have been sacked in just 6 months from Queensland, Brisbane, and NSW hunter valley. With all these job losses more and more families are having to find new homes and new jobs because they have no money. Newcastle herald 23rd march 2013, Apple blames record labels for high prices, Australia has to…show more content…
In the past two months Nissan and Hyundai have beat Holden for the first time in 65 years. Holden gets the most funding then any other car company by over $180 million because it is the company to sell the most cars and make the most profit even though it doesn’t make as many cars .If Holden doesn’t start selling more cars like they used to then the government will have to cut off some of their funding which then will make it impossible for Holden to make cars in our country which then will make Holden go out of business. The daily telegraph, 2nd April 2013, Subway shop staff underpaid for five years. Four stores in NSW have been fined for underpaying vulnerable young staff for five years. There were 11 staff all aged from 15 to 21, with all the 11 staff they have to come up with $52,344 back pay. This doesn’t look good for all subway stores even any fast food stores. This will now take subway out a lot of money and not sure how they will be able to pay it all back, subway may even have to shut down over one stupid mistake from a few…show more content…
The nightmare conditions over the past 48 hours have wiped out crops, halted harvest and cuts numerous roads. The remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone Oswald have dumped up to 750mm of rain in three days across the southern parts of Queensland, including major fruit and vegetable growing regions at Gayndah, Bundaberg and the Lockyer Valley, west of Brisbane.Growcom chairman Alex Livingstone said it was too early to predict the full impact of the big wet on produce supplies.Mr Livingstone said there was a lot of water in fields around Bundaberg and in the Lockyer and Fassifern valleys. This would affect crops, such as carrots, lettuce, sweet corn, beans, peas, capsicums and tomatoes, that were ready for harvest, as well as immature crops due to be picked from April to June.Mr Livingstone said there also were expected to be crop losses in citrus, macadamia and avocado orchards along fast-flowing waterways, such as the Burnett River. It could be several days before growers can get onto their fields to assess crop damage and spray fungicides to protect against disease outbreaks.Mr Livingstone said the timing and duration of supply shortages would depend on how quickly the water dispersed and transport networks could be reopened to allow crops to get to market.’ That was the big problem after the 2010-11 floods - dealing with rural bridges and culverts so people could
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