Hashmi's A Conservative Legacy

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Choose a compelling response article that in your view raises some important issues. Identify this article and then discuss how it opposes, supports, and/or engages in some way the main claims made by El Fadl’s lead essay I felt that Sohail Hashmi’s essay A Conservative Legacy brought forth a very compelling and interesting stance that at the root and origin of the religion of Islam tolerance is central. Throughout Hashmi’s essay he supports Fadl point that the Quran does not only reject a theology of intolerance but rather states, “The Qur'an is a deep well from which Muslims may draw plentiful supplies of tolerance, pluralism, respect for diversity -- even doubt" (32). Hashmi elaborates further stating, “The Qur’an admonishes believers…show more content…
The same cannot be said of modern Islamic states and societies, which lag behind international standards of equality, democracy, and human rights”(32). However, he expresses challenges the opinion of Fadl by disagreeing that literalist readings are exclusively by puritan extremists. It seemed that Fadl’s claims that the only group of people who are seen to take literal interpretations of the Qur’an are those that express and support a violent and intolerant approach to tolerant Muslims and non- Muslims, stating "Narrow and illiberal readings of the Qur'an are not exclusively the province of fringe elements”(32). I…show more content…
Abou El Fadl is particularly critical of Wahhabism, a puritanical revision of Islam propagated by the Saudi monarchy. While Wahhabism claims to be the "straight path" of Islam, it is, according to Abou El Fadl, an “false” form of Islam, forged in the 18th-century slaughter of Muslims and non-Muslims alike. To call it "fundamentalist," he asserts, is misleading, since it defys fundamental Islamic truths and distorts Islam by rejecting any attempt to interpret the divine law historically or contextually (11-12). Fadl utilizes Quranic passages as a way to support claims of the danger behind interpreting scriptural passages that were recorded in another period in history without assessing the historical context and background. Fadl further illuminates the dangers of such misunderstanding and an absence of historical understanding and context in which a passage is written through the examination of the passage “fight those among the People of the Book who do not believe in God or the Hereafter, who do not forbid what God and His Prophet have forbidden, and who do not acknowledge the religion of truth- fight them until they pay the poll tax with willing submission and feel themselves subdued” (13). Fadl discusses the reference of the poll tax, pointing out that it was common inside and outside of Arabia to levy poll taxes against alien groups. Classical Muslim jurists then argued that the poll tax is money collected by the Islamic polity from non-Muslims in return for the
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