Hammurabi'S Code Of Law

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The most remarkable and influential creation of the mesopotamian time is the code of Hammurabi. Hammurabi’s code is the oldest set of laws known to exist. Hammurabi, the VI king and of Babylonia from 1792-1750 B.C., expanded his empire greatly before focusing his energies toward wealth and justice for his people. He created a code protecting all classes of Babylonian society, including women and slaves. He sought protection of the weak from the powerful and the poor from the rich. The carving on the stone on which the code is written depicts Hammurabi receiving the divine laws from the sun god, the god most often associated with justice. Hammurabi’s Code is 44 columns of text, 28 paragraphs of which contain the actual code. There are 282 laws that probably amend common Babylonian law rather than define it. It describes regulations for legal procedure, fixes rates on services performed in most branches of commerce and describes property rights, personal injury, and penalties for false testimony and accusations. It has no laws regarding religion. The Code of Hammurabi is significant because its creation allowed men, women, slaves, and all others to read and understand the laws that governed their lives in Babylon. It is unique in that laws till then were not written down, and thus could be manipulated to suite the rulers that dictated them. The Code is particularly just for its time. The structure of the code is very specific, with each offense receiving a specified punishment. The punishments tended to be harsh by modern standards, with many offenses resulting in death, disfigurement, or the use of the "Eye for eye, tooth for tooth" philosophy. Putting the laws into writing was important in itself because it suggested that the laws were immutable and above the power of any earthly king to change. It also glorifies acts of peace and justice done during

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