Frederick Douglass's Views On Education

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A century ago, many people could have a job without going to school. Most of them did not even possess any basic linguistic skills, yet they had no problem feeding themselves and their families. Hearing this fact, many will frown, confused with how education has grown into one of the most dominant factors in life. People in every race, whether they are young or old, rich or poor, and male or female, pursue education. Indeed, nowadays, proper education plays an extremely important role in determining whether one can get a job, or, to put it bluntly, to survive in this increasingly harsh society. However, what is the reason behind this phenomenon? What really is education that it is highly sought after in our modern society? Defining education…show more content…
(15) Worse yet, even they themselves accept this situation, not attempting to fix it. In another case, Frederick Douglass elaborates his struggle as an ill-fated slave to be a literate person. (129) As a black slave born in an era where racism was at its peak, Douglass endured the restriction from his master. Striped off their rights of proper education, Alexie and Douglass worked on their own ways to learn. Eventually, both of them went on to be successful-Alexie became a writer and Douglass had his own autobiography. Race and status, as seen from the cases above, are not limiting factors for one to savor…show more content…
Nowadays, in most developed countries, even the poorest are literate. The standard of education has improved astronomically, to the point where people set degree as their ultimate goals. In her New York Times article, Lily Artavena reported the recent manipulation of college ranking. This news shows that people prioritize title more than the education itself. Blinded by this idea, the pursuit of education has been hugely tainted by sham actions, which bear similarity to frauds. As jobs become much more specialized, many departments have been forsaken due to its seemingly unyielding quality. Courses such as history, linguistic, other liberal arts subjects have been widely questioned by students, especially college students, of its role in future career. For instance, those who aspire to be doctors are hesitant to enroll in history course, claiming that it is only a waste of money. It is clearly not wrong for a doctor to say his only wherewithal to get the job is his knowledge of biology. However, will he be a successful and perfectly civilized person? John Ciardi, in his essay, explained that, “a civilized mind is, in essence, one that contains many such lives and many such worlds. If you are too much in a hurry or too arrogantly proud of your own limitations, to accept as a gift to your humanity some pieces of the mind of Sophocles, or Aristotle, or Chaucer-and right down the scale and down the
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