Franklin D. Roosevelt And The Great Depression

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born on January 30th, 1882 in Hyde Park, New York to James and Sara Roosevelt. Franklin D. Roosevelt spent his early years at his family’s home. Since he was tutored at home and traveled often with his family, he did not spend much time with children his age. In 1896, at age 14, Roosevelt was sent for his first formal schooling at the prestigious preparatory school, Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts. Roosevelt began his college career at Harvard University in 1900. While at Harvard, he became very active in the schools newspaper, The Harvard Crimson, and became its editor in 1903. The same year, he became engaged to Eleanor Roosevelt. Roosevelt was her maiden and married name. She was his fifth cousin once…show more content…
Franklin would admit that the first parts of the New Deal were in part experimental. He would weed out what didn’t work and press on with what did. His persistence with the new deal through 1939 brought America out of the depression and returned a balanced budget. With the economy on the up rise, Roosevelt now turned to foreign policy, something that had been put on a back burner because of the economy. He felt strongly about keeping good relations with other countries, but at the same time warned Americans of the danger of remaining isolated from a world that was slowly being taken over by dictators in Germany, Italy, and Japan. He was in turn dominated by an isolationists Congress that felt that U.S involvement in World War I was a big mistake and were determined to prevent the United States from being drawn into another European war. When World War II broke out in Europe in 1939, Roosevelt called Congress into special session to revise neutrality acts to permit allies to buy American arms on a “cash-and-carry” basis. But Great Britain quickly became…show more content…
I thought him to be a great president, but wasn’t completely sure why. I never could have imagined the things he did for our country. He knew it was inevitable that we would be drawn into war, but instead of pressing Congress to enter war, he let the war come to us. Something most leaders would never consider. I have the utmost respect for FDR for the way he handled his disability. Searching the internet for pictures of the man, I found very few of him actually in the confines of his wheel chair. Even cartoonists of his time never drew animations of him in a wheel chair. He never considered himself “disabled”. He instead persevered and didn’t allow polio to hinder his number one priority, his country. Before, I considered him to be one of the top four or five presidents in U.S history, but after learning more and more about what he did, and not only what he did, how he went about it, I now consider him the most effective president in our nation’s
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