Flq Case Study

2900 Words12 Pages
October of 1962, the secretive group called the Comite de la Liberation Nationale (CLN) decided it was time to go public and to cause mass havoc to our capitalist system in order to produce a totally independent, socialist Quebec. According to Sean M. Maloney, the CLN was operating under the wings of the Rassemblement Independence Nationale and decided to change its name to the more commonly known name: Le Front de la Liberation du Quebec. As soon as February of 1963 arrived, secret plans to carry out bomb attacks were made and throughout the year, 34 attacks took place. To gain the public’s eye and to grab the media spotlight, the FLQ distributed tracts of their goals and general plans to follow. Based on the previous incidents, analysis forecasted…show more content…
In Sean M. Maloney’s article he explained that there was no head delegate, but rather, there were several cells that communicated between each other. They were extremely versatile in accomplishing their respective goals because they covered such a vast area and were not in a single location. Several cells across Quebec worked very actively in selling their idea, raising support in the form of funds, and getting their supporters active in demonstrations. The cells of the FLQ were led by a central secret group that was never identified, and so the methods of operation and tactics are still not fully understood. “A 1970 estimate suggests that there were in the vicinity of 100 ‘trigger pullers’, 100 propagandists, 200 to 300 dealing with infrastructure and up to 3,000 other passive sympathizers.”3 Even though there was not a set, public FLQ representative, there were some men that had a higher ranking than others, and these were the men who left for Cuba. The key to see here is that these were estimates, and even after almost 40 years, the mentality and overall works of the FLQ are still unsure. In essence, the goal of the FLQ to be secretive and sly was obtained in the simple fact that people still do not know everything about them to this…show more content…
On this day, James Cross, a British Trade Commissioner was kidnapped. Demands for the ransom of Cross “included the release of 23 ‘political prisoners,’ $500,000 in gold, broadcast and publication of the FLQ Manifesto, and an aircraft to take the kidnappers to Cuba or Algeria.” The day after the kidnapping of Cross, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau agreed that a joint effort between the Quebec and Federal Government would be made in deciding to agree to the demands of the FLQ terrorists. A radio station received explicit information that if the demands were not met, Mr. Cross’ life would be in jeopardy. The FLQ Manifesto was broadcasted and published in the news across Quebec.12 According to Maloney, almost immediately after the kidnapping of Mr. Cross, the Police tapped off and searched an FLQ training camp. There, they found explicit plans to steal from several ammunitions depots. Soon thereafter, another kidnapping of the Minister of Labour happened. Pierre Laporte was taken while he was standing on the front yard of his home on October 10th while playing touch football with his
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