Explore How Steinbeck Presents Loneliness in Chapter 4 in 'of Mice and Men'

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Explore how Steinbeck presents loneliness in Chapter 4 Tara Clee Throughout the novel, Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck focuses on the idea that people who are lonely have most need of dreams to help them through. All of the characters have a lonely life, except for Lennie and George whose friendship is never questioned. Chapter 4 is when Crooks’, Candy’s and Curleys wife’s isolation is made clear to the reader. “This here’s my room…I ain’t wanted in the bunkhouse, and you ain’t wanted in my room.” “This here’s my room…I ain’t wanted in the bunkhouse, and you ain’t wanted in my room.” “A guy needs somebody – to be near him” and “a guy gets too lonely” and “A guy sets alone out here at night.” “A guy needs somebody – to be near him” and “a guy gets too lonely” and “A guy sets alone out here at night.” Crooks lives in enforced solitude, away from the other men. Crooks dreams of being seen as equal to everyone else. He remembers fondly his childhood, when he played with white children who came to his family's chicken ranch, and longs for a similar relationship with white people again. Excluded from the companionship that exists in the bunkhouse – no cards or chat. His possessions include books as he reads instead of having company, and he has no choice but to endure this prejudice and isolation. Consequently, he bitterly guards his enforced privacy, saying to Lennie, “This here’s my room…I ain’t wanted in the bunkhouse, and you ain’t wanted in my room.” He is regretting the way that he taunted Lennie, “A guy needs somebody – to be near him” and “a guy gets too lonely” and “A guy sets alone out here at night.” It is implied that Crooks is thrilled when Lennie and Candy come into his room and are his companions for a night. Due the ways Crooks is constantly treated with rudeness and arrogance, Crooks turns the table and torments innocent Lennie which can make the
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