Eureka Stockade Rebellion

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The Eureka Stockade; Rebellion or Revolution? Conditions on the Australian goldfields were harsh. Many diggers lived in tents, or even rough, open bark shelters. Those who stayed longer sometimes built larger slab hut dwellings, but these were still very basic. People would live in small humpies made out of wood, scraps and things found around the area. Also many people would live in a canvas tent because they were cheap and portable. Later in the gold rush, when people were more certain about whether they were staying or not, people might decide to live in small cottages. These cottages often incorporated solid brick and stone fireplaces, instead of the diggers having to do all their cooking outside. The fields were crowded and unsanitary,…show more content…
Following a widespread licence hunt on November 30, Irish immigrant Peter Lalor was elected to lead the rebellion, which culminated in the huge battle, now known as the Battle of the Eureka Stockade, on December 3. Then there is the issue of a corrupt magistrate. Scobie’s death is the best example of this. The death of James Scobie, an unassuming Scottish gold miner added wood to the fire. After becoming involved in a fight at the Eureka Hotel, also known as Bentley's Hotel, Scobie died on 7 October 1854. An investigation into his death absolved the hotel owner, Bentley, and his staff of any wrongdoing. The miners, however, felt that justice had not been carried out, and held a meeting outside the hotel in mid-October. After the meeting a crowd of diggers burnt Bentley’s hotel to the ground. Soon after three diggers were arrested and charged with arson for their part in setting fire to the hotel. On 11 November, 10,000 diggers met to demand the release of the three diggers, the abolition of the licence and the vote for all males. The outcome of this meeting was the forming of the Ballarat Reform League under the chairmanship of Chartist John Basson Humffray . This was followed by an even larger meeting on 29 November where the diggers decided to publicly…show more content…
More troopers were sent from Melbourne, and miners had to endure even more frequent licence checks, and more frequent clashes between miners and troopers. The response of the miners to the extra licence checks was to build the Stockade, named the Eureka Stockade, and barricade themselves in so the troopers couldn't get in to check their licences. In turn, the response of the authorities to this was to send in armed soldiers to break down the stockade, which was only flimsy anyway. This was the battle of the Eureka
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