Erdrich Dbq Analysis

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Sources Document A http://americanindiantah.com//FederalIndianPolicy.html Document B http://www.skyways.org/towns/Satanta/history.html Document C http://amhist.ist.unomaha.edu/module_files/Best%20Westward%20Expansion%20Map.jpg Document D http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/erdrich/boarding/gallery.htm Document E http://www.pbs.org/indiancountry/history/boarding2.html Document F http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/E/manifest/manif2.htm Document G http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/polk/aa_polk_wilmot_3.html Document H http://www.cyberbee.com/manifest_destiny/destiny_files/image025.gif Document I http://www.nativeamerican.co.uk/gast.html Justifications Sources Document A This image depicts the Dawes Severalty Act. The Dawes Act essentially allowed Natives to buy land if they were…show more content…
Trails and railroads during this time inevitably passed through native lands that in some cases had previously been protected by treaties. These treaties were tossed aside and hardly recognized by American settlers. Document D This is a 1912 photograph of children standing in front of the Tulalip Indian School’s girls’ dormitory building. Since Native Americans were being forced to become more like “proper” Americans, their children around this time were sent to schools that taught English. In some cases, the schools felt that the children would be more effectively pulled from their tribal culture if they were sent to boarding schools. Document E This quote from Lone Wolf demonstrates the almost forced assimilation of Native Americans in this time period. If Native Americans wanted to stay on their lands, they were required to adapt to English ways. That meant that the children received English names and their appearances were altered from traditional long, braided hair and cultural clothing to a more American dress. Document
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