Empirically Justifiable Religion

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Empirically Justifiable Religions and Power In the past, religious beliefs were justified by many people and rulers and were seen as superior to that of other non-believer religions. This however did lead to the persecution of many minority religions and some religions were even oppressed, while others embraced and accepted other faiths and religious practices more openly. This occurred mainly in the rulings of leaders and their empires such as the Ottoman, and Mughal, as well as in Tokugawa Japan. The Ottoman Empire, which practiced and believed firmly in Islam justified this religion mainly after their conquering of Constantinople and their conquest of the Middle East. The Ottoman’s were able to blend a large amount of diversity during…show more content…
As well, following Islam and being Muslim meant that these citizens believed in the supreme and sole God named Allah. However, this empire did not persecute other religious beliefs such as Hinduism, or Christianity as harshly as the Ottoman’s had done yet their strength still rested mainly on necessary military power to keep the empire together. This is because the Mughal’s found it challenging to unify and control the region of India mainly because of how significant the cultural diversity was in India. Under the ruler Akbar, any tax imposed on non-believer religions was abolished and instead the Mughal’s “patronized other beliefs [while] displaying a tolerance that earned it a widespread legitimacy.” (476) From this widespread acceptance the Mughal’s implemented a Divine Faith, which emphasized different virtues towards a longing for God. From these virtues varying from being pious and prudent to liberality, allowed for a “multifaceted spiritual kingdom under one political roof” (476). This promoted and benefitted the Mughal’s because from this long term of peace and stability they flourished commercially and benefitted from the wealth of surrounding regions which further bolstered and improved their own…show more content…
The Tokugawa mainly was involved with their faiths of Buddhism which closely mirrored Hinduism and Shinto which was seen as the way of the gods. Also the Tokugawa followed main Confucian beliefs of harmony and obedience as well as Daoist traditions. The Shogunate also believed that the emperor ruled based on the Mandate of Heaven which meant that he had been chosen by Heaven for his talents and virtue. Ruling in the name of the emperor, the Tokugawa “regulated foreign intrusion...[and] it remained free from outside intrusion” (511). This is because the Japanese authorities took notice that Christian converts were not tolerant to that of other religions and faith and believed Christ to be superior. This caused the Japanese to enforce a ban on the practice of Christianity and as well tried to limit and prohibit any conversion to Christian faith. From this suppression, the Tokugawa drove the European missionaries out of their country and even strictly regulated trade to ensure that foreigners could not threaten the security of Japan or the empire. This caused the Japanese to only have permitted relations with the Chinese, and Koreans. However, only the Protestants and nonmissionizing Dutch outsiders had permission to engage in trade with Japan, yet, even they were as well strictly regulated and supervised in their own fashion and confined to their own island near Nagasaki. In this, Japan’s
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