Emily Dickinson Poem Paper

661 WordsOct 24, 20123 Pages
“I taste a liquor never brewed” by Emily Dickinson describes the importance of nature to her. Through Dickinson’s use of images and figurative language she shows that nature can be as intoxicating as any alcoholic drink. To begin with, Dickinson’s uses of figurative language can be seen throughout the poem. When Dickinson uses figurative language, she also paints images in the minds of her readers. She accomplishes this by describing how she sees summer; “Reeling, through endless summer days, / From inns of molten blue. / When landlords turn the drunken bee / Out of the foxglove’s door, / When butterflies renounce their drams, / I shall but drink the more!” (syllabus). Dickinson’s use of figurative language in this stanza shows the image of her staggering through summer days going from inn to inn or pubs. Landlords of the inns finally turn the drunken bee, which is Dickinson, away and kick her out of the foxglove’s or flower’s door. She then states, “When butterflies renounce their drams, / I shall but drink the more!” (syllabus). The butterflies renounce the amount of alcohol they will take in and so Dickinson will drink more alcohol. This creates the illusion that she is drunk, but, she is not drunk off alcohol; she is drunk off nature. Also, Dickinson’s use of figurative language allows her readers to make the connection between her love for nature and her use of alcohol. She makes it seem like she is enjoying alcohol, but she is really enjoying nature. She uses words such as bee, foxglove, and butterflies to make this connection. In the stanza, “Reeling, through endless summer days, / From inns of molten blue. / When landlords turn the drunken bee / Out of the foxglove’s door, / When butterflies renounce their drams, / I shall but drink the more!” (syllabus). Dickinson compares herself to the bees and butterflies that drink the nectar from the flowers. She

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