Electoral College Problems

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The Electoral College The Electoral College is a system in which states are given electoral votes based on population. Each state is given two electoral votes to start and is given an extra vote for every, on average, 600,000 people that live in that state (Marczak ). At first it was created to solve the problems of directly electing a president. Most of those problems seem to have evaporated over the almost two hundred and fifty year lifespan of The United States. There are very few problems that still remain and each problem seems to have an easy solution that is already in place but just not being utilized. Now there are more problems associated with the Electoral College than there were with directly electing a president in the first…show more content…
These electors are not required by law to vote the same way that their state would like them to vote. “Because of its proven pliability, the Electoral College invites partisan operatives, legislators, secretaries of state and even Supreme Court justices to engage in constant strategic mischief and manipulation at the state level” (Raskin). This means that the electors can be easily influenced by other people if they don’t first get corrupted by their own power. One might argue back that the same power could corrupt the public with selfishness and greed (Ross). It’s quite necessary to be a little bit greedy when voting because almost no one is going to set out with the intention of helping others without first helping themselves. So therefore one shouldn’t assume that there will be someone to protect and instead that person should just vote to benefit themselves right out of the…show more content…
The fact of it is that the presidential candidates don’t spend time in the most populated states such as California and New York, but they spend most of their time trying to gain the votes of the aforementioned swing states. Under a system called the National Popular Vote Plan, as system in which the people of The United States directly elect the president, presidential candidates would be forced to travel to more populated areas rather than all over one unpopulated state that he/she thinks will win them the election. Someone might also say that the presidential candidates would just end up traveling to the top ten most populated cities. If they were to do that, they would only be visiting a maximum of 7.8% of America’s total population. If each candidate was to visit the top fifty most populated cities in The United Sates they would still only be visiting a maximum of 14.6% of America’s population. That 14.6% also happens to be spread over twenty six different states not including the District of Columbia ("City
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