Eight Men Out Research Paper

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American Literature 11 May 2008 Eight Men Out? “Regardless of the verdict of juries, no player who throws a ballgame, no player that undertakes or promises to throw a ballgame, no player that sits in conference with a bunch of crooked players and gamblers where the ways and means of throwing a game are discussed and does not promptly tell his club about it, will ever play professional baseball.” This is what the Commissioner of Major League Baseball decided in 1920, following the greatest scandal of baseball history, possibly even sports history (Linder 10). Eight Chicago White Sox Players in 1919 were accused of throwing games for money in the fall classic championship, The World Series. The 1919 White Sox were highly favored to win the…show more content…
He played tough defense at first. Gandil hit about .290 (about .290 and above is considered good hitting) and was considered the best defensive first basemen at the time. However, in 1919, Gandil was rapidly approaching the end of his career due to his age. Gandil, along with most of the players, was underpaid, and he also had little hope of a financially comfortable life after his sports career would come to an end. Gandil was familiar with many gamblers and gangsters, and thus, began to lay groundwork for the fix. Gandil played the ring-leader in the fix (Pellowski 25-26). Gandil knew he couldn’t throw the series with just himself and his buddy, Swede Risberg, so he started to go after their star pitchers, Eddie Cicotte and Lefty Williams. He always approached players, telling them that the fix would go on with or without them. He then concluded he still couldn’t ensure a fix with just the four of them, so he decided to draft the three big bats in their lineup- Jackson, Weaver, and Felsch. This would make eight along with a Fred McMullin, a utility infielder, who tagged along (Pellowski 40). Gandil played eight years, hit .290 and had a fielding percentage of .992-nearly perfect (“The Eight Men” 2). However, during the series, Gandil’s fielding percentage was less and hit only .233 (“1919 World Series” 5). This goes to show that Gandil did not give his all to win games, and he deserved to be banned. He…show more content…
He was a rising star with a bright future and was remembered as a tough player. There were even people saying he fought Ty Cobb once, known for his aggressiveness and bad temper (Pellowski 31). The sure handed play with good range and a strong arm helped him earn a spot on the Sox at shortstop, moving Buck Weaver to third base (Pellowski 15). Risberg was Gandil’s buddy and assistant in the fix. Risberg was easy to spot as a crook in the fix. He had a lifetime batting average of .243, which isn’t bad considering he played only four years and had his whole career in front of him (“The Eight Men” 3). During the series, Risberg hit a measly, pathetic .080, getting two hits in twenty five chances (“1919 World Series” 3). It was a big mistake for Risberg to get involved, with a bright future in baseball ahead of him. However, he too deserved to be banned from
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