Edgar F Wolfe Essay

735 WordsMay 14, 20133 Pages
Document III As the Progressive Era began in 1900 its effects spread to many different scopes of American life, one of which was the expansion baseball. In 1903 American and National leagues were formed, and the World Series was conceived. As baseball’s popularity grew during the 1920s, misconceptions grew as to the main audience attending baseball games, which prompted Edgar F. Wolfe to write this primary source article, “The Benevolent Brotherhood of Baseball Bugs”, originally published in Literary Digest. Edgar F. Wolfe’s major point in this article is that no matter what walk of life you come from, whether it be a wealthy business owner or a poor worker in a factory, baseball is a unifying force where the struggles between classes do not matter and every citizen of the United States can unite in “rooting” for a common team and goal. Edgar F. Wolfe claims that “nothing has gripped an entire people as baseball has gripped the American nation from the highest to the lowest”. Wolfe is saying that baseball has transcended the hardships and the prosperous times by uniting an entire nation in a common interest. Wolfe is also describing the vast classes of people that baseball has captured. Baseball has sunk its hooks into the very wealthy, as well as the very poor. Baseball does not prescribe to the notion that some classes are better than other; everyone is equal in the game of baseball. Wolfe goes on to explain that “nothing has ever been known to form such a bond of common interest between men of all ranks”. He is trying to convey the message that while sitting in the grandstands at a baseball game, there are no differences between the fans. The game of baseball bonds together people that would typically never have a common thread and finds a mutual driving force that throws away previous differences, if only for the deration of the baseball game.
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