Dorothy May Cherry: A Vietnam Soldier

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The Vietnam War (1954-1975), commonly referred to as “Americas longest war” (however, no longer true to this day), was one of the most poignant wars in American history. For about fifteen years, North Vietnam (Democratic), fought against the American-supported South Vietnam (Republic). The US withdrew troops out of the war in early 1973; however the Vietnamese continued fighting for an additional two years, eventually leading up to the dwindling of South Vietnam under the hand of the North. The US failed to achieve their objective of securing the North from falling under the rule of a communist government. A nation familiar to victory underwent their first major defeat, which would haunt the lives of Americans for centuries I was privileged…show more content…
She was the oldest out of eight siblings; she had both 3 brothers and 3 sisters. Due to the many siblings she had, she wasn’t able to attend college, thus being able to meet my grandfather Clearance in the year 1955. Together they had a total of six kids, in which my grandmother stayed home and cared for them, while my grandfather open and ran his own personal construction business. Much is to be said about my grandmother, but I could talk days on end about her. She is by far one of the most influential people in my life, her hard-work and optimism are just two of the things I admire most about her. Unfortunately my grandmother, had limited knowledge of the war itself, but had extensive amounts of familiarity with the social aspect of the sixties. My grandmother was 19 at the time of the war, but without attending college she had little to no familiarity with what was going on at the time. She quoted, “The closest I ever got to knowing discrete information about the war was when it came on the radio.” However, she was able to tell us how racism affected her life personally. She mentioned how she wasn’t able to use certain bathrooms, water fountains, stores, and even gas…show more content…
She stated how difficult it was to live through that point in time, but at one point in her life came to conclude that it would eventually have to end. For the most part, when people think of the sixties they think of The Beetles, recreational drugs or music festivals, perhaps. Rarely does racism, patriotism or even the Vietnam War come to thought when the sixties are mentioned. Americans tend to think of this time as an innovative cultural shift, rather than the social disaster this time really was, which my grandmother did. Though she didn’t know much about to war, she definitely had a lot to say about Nixon’s presidency. She full-heartedly disagreed with Nixon’s proposal to continue sending in more troops. She said, and I quote, “Nixon was dumb. What makes him think it is fair to send more fathers and sons to be killed in war?” Luckily for my grandmother, she was not directly affected by the war or anyone in her family for a matter of fact, thus, not taking much interest in the war itself. Approaching the interview, I was expecting to get lots more from my grandmother, than I ultimately received. In comparison with the stories I heard in class and what my grandmother had to say, I would honestly have to say I was in a
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