Domestic Violence Policy

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National Policy on Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse By Denise A. Davis Jordan Abstract Upon determining my research topic for this particular paper I took into consideration the benefits it would have on my current occupation, so I chose National Policy on Domestic Violence. Since I am new to the position of Shelter Manager Advocate, there is much I did not know about the policies pertaining to Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse. I presumed since it is prevalent in today’s society and having experienced it personally that there had to be history dating back for centuries. I began questioning just how long there had been national policies to prevent it. I began looking on line for as much historical data and records as I could…show more content…
There have been reports of domestic violence since the dawn of time, in every country, including the good ole USA. Since the early 1500s, settlers in America based their laws on Old-English common-law that permitted wife beating explicitly for correction purposes, especially if the instrument being used was no wider than their thumb. Alabama was the first state to rescind the legal right of men to beat their wives in 1871. In 1882, Maryland became the first state to pass a law making it a crime for a husband to beat his wife punishable by 40 lashes or a year in jail, while North Carolina declared that criminal charges could not be brought against a husband unless the battery on his wife resulted in permanent injury, endangered their life or was malicious beyond all reason. Two major elements have sealed the status of woman for more than six thousand years. Women have been oppressed and beaten with the approval of societies that are dominated by the male sex. Years ago, laws even stated that any woman that was even verbally abusive to her husband was to have her name engraved on a brick. Later, that brick would be used to knock out her…show more content…
The Pennsylvania Coalition against Domestic Violence began holding regional retreats and statewide meetings in order to build support, involve more women, and strengthen support of coalition activities in 1981. 1984 saw the Duluth Project in Minnesota whereby the first criminal justice response model to domestic violence was coordinated. Then on September 13, 1994, the Violence Against Women Act or (VAWA) was signed into law as part of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) creates and supports comprehensive, effective, and cost saving responses to the crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, and sexual assault and stalking. VAWA programs, administered by the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services, have dramatically changed federal, tribal, state, and local responses to these
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