Doing Better but Feeling Worse: the Paradox of Choice” by Barry Schwartz and Andrew Ward

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Choose In the essay “Doing Better but Feeling Worse: The Paradox of Choice” by Barry Schwartz and Andrew Ward, explains the fundamental need to choose. All humans have fundamental needs and one of those needs is to have the freedom of choice. Schwartz and Andrew explain that having options to choose from is good; however, it is not always good. Having too many varieties to choose from can be hazardous. As Schwartz and Andrew explains an experiment done by Iyengar and Lepper on different varieties of jam as well as quantity. The lower quantity of jam attracted less people; however, more people bought the product. In the larger varieties of jams, more people were attracted; however, less people bought the product. Overall, in both cases people tasted the same amount of jams. Schwartz and Ward also explains that people who chose to get married, have close friends, and spends time with families are more happier than those who do not. “A typical American supermarket carries more than 30,000 items…more than 20,000 new products hit the shelves every year” (Schwartz; Ward). Is there too much product to choose from? Many people would say yes. Knowing my household, they definitely would say yes. In the essay “Doing Better but Feeling Worse: The Paradox of Choice” by Barry Schwartz and Andrew Ward, explains the many choices humans have in an everyday life. Schwartz and Ward are correct having too much too choose from is health hazardous, as well as having too much varieties is not always the best part of freedom of choice. The typical supermarket has over 30,000 items, with over 20,000 more products hitting the shelves every year (2). Having that many choices is incredibly ridiculous. Many of those products are from the same company, just a different brand name along with one or two ingredients added or taken away, that is the game companies like to play. However, many

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