Does Affirmative Action Contradict Itself?

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Does Affirmative Action Contradict Itself? Slavery was abolished in 1865 by the addition of the 13th amendment, but that did not stop the southern states from adapting Jim Crowe laws stating “separate but equal” (“Affirmative Action”). African Americans along with other minority groups were banned from public facilities, schools, restrooms and any other public areas open to white people. Segregation continued until the late 1950s. In 1955 “Dwight D. Eisenhower signed an executive order prohibiting discrimination against any employee or applicant for employment in the federal government because of race, color, or national origin” (“Affirmative Action”). Although this did not completely end segregation once and for all, it did bring about…show more content…
While the statement is true and affirmative action has in fact opened many doors to African Americans it has also set many up for failure and has begun a path of separation again. People of colored skin have been singled out by rules and guidelines of companies for decades and yet the government still wants to call it fair. Is it really fair though? Is it fair to give a job to someone just because of the color of their skin? We are now separating people based off our assumptions of what someone can do and what someone cannot do. By doing that we have brought ourselves back to separating races. It is now dark skin versus light skin in the race for job opportunities and African Americans are getting preferential treatment without calling for…show more content…
Affirmative action has been in place for too long and has begun to do more harm than good for American citizens of all races. “Current affirmative action policies must be abandoned in favor of general nondiscriminatory policies that allow for no preferential treatment in the public of private sector based on race” (Schuck, Peter). Separating individuals based on skin color to allow for equal treatment is completely brainless. “Americans would be better served if we upheld our commitment to equal opportunity for all Americans, regardless of race and ethnicity” (Schuck,
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