Do People Truly Benefit from Hardship and Misfortune?

467 Words2 Pages
Do people truly benefit from hardship and misfortune? Yes 1. Thomas Edison – required many trials before he accomplished his goal of inventing the light bulb 2. Obama—grew up in a poor family/low social status. He benefited from understanding the hardships of poor families in America and this influenced his policy as President 3. Churchill—During WWII, the British government suffered immense losses because the German troops surrounded the entire country by airplanes and battle ships. However, despite these hardships, Churchill inspired the British to not give up and influenced his troops to courageously fight the German troops. Eventually, the British benefited from this misfortune because they were able to unify under a common cause. It’s widely acknowledged that there are some values in adversity and calamity. However, some people may not essentially perceive the profound impacts from where they tumbled. Because of the disappointment from their struggles, they just choose to blindly accept their hardships instead of recognizing the benefits that can result from misfortune. **don’t support the other side** Ultimately, it’s manifest that the individuals who find value in adversity eventually achieve success. To begin, Thomas Edison, a famous American inventor, epitomizes the idea that people can truly benefit from hardship and misfortune. Throughout his career, Edison experienced a vast amount of difficulties and unluckiness when he was inventing a lamp that would be efficient, yet inexpensive. Each time he failed, he would contemplate his shortcomings so that he can prepare for his next trial. Simultaneously, he conducted many trials before he accomplished his goal of inventing the light bulb. Therefore, it’s clear that Edison’s hardship in inventing the light bulb proved to be beneficial. Another historical example is Churchill, whose

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