Division-1: System Analysis

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Formerly known as Division-1, the BCS is a system implemented into the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision to crown a “mythical” champion. Currently this division is the only one in the NCAA that does not host a play off or tourney in order to crown an overall champion of this division. In talking about the BCS we will touch on several aspects such as history that will lead to the BCS creation, reasoning behind the system, and then breaking down how the rating system actually works. From all of this the goal in mind is not only be able to understand the system, but also to be well informed enough to begin to form an opinion on if the ratings are done in a fair manner. The NCAA as an entirety has always held tournaments in order to crown a champion…show more content…
Six conferences, including the Big Ten, Pac-10, ACC, Big East, Big 12 and SEC committed their champions to play under the this system. While this system worked great for awhile, because it does indeed create a playoff atmosphere throughout the season. Along with fact that many college football fans loved the idea of keeping the historic and very traditional college football bowl game; it was not long before many people started to question based off the way the system works if the national champion that was crowned was indeed the true national champion of college football for the…show more content…
This in turn would cause a split of the national championship. The idea of splitting a national title was not acceptable to any one school, because of course any one school would like to have the “bragging rights” to claim the national championship; most importantly though the split would it allow the two true top two teams in the nation to play against one another for the title, this is where the idea of a mythical crown comes into play, or a sense of false achievement. However, the decision was made to let the two conferences continue to play in the Rose Bowl and a new ranking system would be implemented. Officials felt in order of it to be level all the way around the board the BCS needed to be broken into multiple categories, then from this point they began to set the guidelines for how the BCS standing would be determined. The BCS standings are derived from The Harris Interactive College Football Poll, USA Today Coaches Poll and computer rankings. Each one of these would comprise a third of the total BCS rankings. To derive the three percentages, each team is assigned an inverse point total, twenty-five points for number one, twenty-four for number two, and so on. The two poll percentages are calculated by dividing each team's point total by a maximum 2850 possible points from the Harris Poll and
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