Dieppe Raid Summary

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The Decision to Mount the Dieppe Raid The Price of Lessons Learned Canadian Military History If we could only travel back in time and actually sit in the planning war rooms prior to the raid on the French town of Dieppe. Who would someone talk to in order to get the real reason behind Canada being involved in mounting the Dieppe raid in late summer of 1942? Both writers point of view diverge several times but converge on many of the same topics. All in all, neither of the articles can contest the will and effort of the Canadians during this fateful operation in 1942. These articles are both written in historical format and written in a manner that is more focused on the reading by those interested in history than for general readership.…show more content…
The questions he poses “was a plan that should never have seen the light of day implemented because British commanders had at their disposal expendable colonial force?”3 is a great example of Canadians needing control over themselves. This brings up one of the most important portions of the article, and the reason why this article is a much better read, which is that Canadian lack of control, either to make decisions themselves or overshadowed by the powerful British, allowed Canada to be so heavily involved in the Dieppe Raid. Villa fails to emphasize this point by overstating the importance of what seemed like the Canadians being in control of the battle. It seems that Villa believed that the amout of planning and authority was lessened by the fact that there were so mny planners yet the Canadians did have the lead and were still shackeled by the British wanting control over everything including the planning process. This operation would have gone on whether the Canadians were involved or not according Henshaw. He goes on to suggest that Canada needed a bigger voice at the Cabinet during the war effort. It was Canada’s own pressure that moved the flawed and unworkable plan into action mainly because the Canadian Army needed to get itself baptised in a real…show more content…
This is clearly explained by Henshaw. The sense of nationalism was prevalent within the military system as much as it was back at home. There was no doubt that the Canadian Army had power at the British table. There had already been concessions made that gave Canada the authority, from Britian and with the support of Ottawa, power base to make its own decisions for raids from Britain. Peter Henshaw explains the power that the two Generals, McNaughton and Crerar, had prior to the Dieppe Raid. Henshaw writes that “under the new balance of bureaucratic power negotiated in that same month, the Commanders of the Canadian Army in Britain were the only authority anywhere with the power to cancel the Dieppe Raid on military grounds.”4 Ottawa had released some of it decision making power to the Generals on the ground who had a much better view of what was happening in Europe. The Villa article misses the mark on this point. Although there are some vauge references to the nationalism sentiment Villa does not discuss how important it was for the Canadians, stationed on the island of England for so long, needed to be proven with a Canadian identity. The majority of the final page of Villa’s article puts a negative spin on the efforts of the Canadians taking the power and authority and proving themselves in
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