Diagnosis: Not Enough Nurses Analysis

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REMEMBER: A good summary: 1. states the title, source, and author (if given) at the beginning 2. includes the main points of the text without changing them or adding your own ideas 3. states the most important supporting points without changing them (and without using numerous statistics and quotations) 4. uses your own words, and uses quotations marks when using exact words from the text 5. periodically reminds the reader that you are summarizing someone else’s work GOOD SUMMARY In her article “Diagnosis: Not Enough Nurses,” published in the December 12, 2005 issue of Newsweek, Anne Underwood discusses the growing need for nurses. Underwood reports that 30 states currently have a shortage of nurses, with that number predicted…show more content…
In fact, 30 U.S. states today have nursing shortages. And by 2020, the government projects, 44 states plus the District of Columbia will have shortfalls. Many people don’t want to do this job anymore because it’s demanding work and can be dangerous. Diana Mason, editor in chief of the American Journal of Nursing says, “we will never have enough nurses unless we fix the work environment.” In order to address this problem, some facilities have tried out some different solutions, for example, more than 1,000 nurses from the Philippines were hired in the U.S. in the last five years. Other facilities are increasing salaries, and providing better hours and working conditions. Maybe eventually even more men will choose to join this…show more content…
With life-expectancy increasing, this problem is only going to get worse. I was interested in the parallel problems in the field of nursing and the field of education – many of the problems and proposed solutions in nursing and teaching are quite similar – not enough incoming workers to replace retiring ones, a need to reduce case loads/class sizes and increase salaries, and a need to improve working conditions. One point Underwood brings up remains a problem, though. She explains that there is a problem of shrinking resources at nursing schools and indicated that in 2004, “understaffed nursing schools had to turn away more than 32,000 qualified applicants.” These numbers show that there IS a population of people who DO want to become nurses. However, changing the working environment, increasing salaries and reducing workloads for nurses in the field is not going to change whatever problem is causing the shortage of qualified faculty at nursing schools, so that is a serious problem that will need attention as
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