Developing Social Care: Values And Principles

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Developing social care: values and principles Barbara Waine, Jane Tunstill and Pamela Meadows with Mark Peel http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/positionpapers/pp04/values.pdf 2005 The Policy Press Children’s services inevitably provide a platform for robust and detailed debate around values and principles because historically their development has required politicians to engage simultaneously with three important agendas: The child/family/state relationship: This generates a persistent tension about the authority of parents and the right of the state (in the form of the children’s services workforce) to intervene to regulate their conduct. It also means that ’children’s services’ cannot be detached from public policy in respect of…show more content…
• Achieve economic well being. At the same time, there is a parallel stress on the need to support families by facilitating early (voluntary) rather than later (compulsory) interventions: Every child needs – and deserves – the best possible start to life. And this is what almost all receive, from their parents and from family and friends, who encourage them, support them and do all they can to help them fulfil their potential. (NCSC, 2004)117 Such services also attract a set of principles to ensure the translation of this value position into practice reality. This is exemplified by the government’s statement of principles for Sure Start: 1. Working with parents and children 2. Services for everyone, but not the same service for everyone 3. Flexible at point of…show more content…
The responses from family members point to a proactive, not merely reactive, role for social workers. This model supports the integration of a family strengths approach, an ecological approach and a lifespan perspective which takes account of changing needs and the successful resolution of problems. It also acknowledges the importance of partnership-based work, and of an understanding of the effects of chronic poverty on children’s long-term development and parental mental health, and recognises the structural and environmental influences on families. Specific messages for social workers from family members involved in the project include: • Poverty is not just about money – it is about dignity and self-respect for parents and children. • Demonstrate an understanding that ‘neglect’ can be created by society as well as by individuals. • People do not want handouts – they want to help themselves. • Respect people enough to explain things, and do not label or pre-judge people, but get to know the individual. • Listen to what families think would help
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