Dante Inferno Essay

1946 WordsMay 18, 20138 Pages
Inferno is the first part of Dante Alighieri's 14th-century epic poem Divine Comedy. It is an allegory telling of the journey of Dante through Hell, guided by the Roman poet Virgil. In the poem, Hell is depicted as nine circles of suffering located within the Earth. Allegorically, the Divine Comedy represents the journey of the soul towards God, with the Inferno describing the recognition and rejection of sin. Dante's Inferno encapsulates all sinners and beasts within the nine circles of suffering. Deformed, disfigured and devouring, these sinners are damned to suffer eternally within various categories of sins. For each category of sin is a punishment that relates to the committed sin. Dante's Inferno encapsulates all sinners and beasts within the nine circles of suffering. Deformed, disfigured and devouring, these sinners are damned to suffer eternally within various categories of sins. For each category of sin is a punishment that relates to the committed transgression. By evaluating one particular sin, Dante's symbolism and ideas of punishment become obvious. Through analysis of specific deformities of the soothsayers in the Fourth Bolgia, it is evident that their punishment directly reflects the sin they committed. Although the soothsayers only present one circle of the many sins within the Inferno, their punishment is related to the numerous other punishments that are rooted in symbolism and physical suffering in Hell. When matching sinners to their punishments, Dante focuses on the sinner's recognition and regret of their sin as well as representative physical pain and suffering. By applying the idea of counterpass to the soothsayers, Dante's punishment of sin with symbolism is better understood. When comparing Foucault's later theory of punishment to Dante's soothsayers it becomes evident that Foucault's more contemporary theory of pain and punishment can

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