Cult Of Domesticity Research Paper

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Maya Coale Coale 1 Mr. Liebesman AP US History 10 April 2012 Cult of Domesticity Throughout history the subjugation of women has been a steadfast reality. A (white) man can travel to any time or place and know that when he arrives, he will be welcomed with open arms. He will not have to worry about discrimination or unfair roles in society. For women however, it is a different story. Up until within the last twenty or thirty years women have been confined into boxes designed to keep them in their place. This was no different during the nineteenth century. America had just fought and won a war to gain independence…show more content…
Housework was a very important task and women were supposed to take great joy in it. Upper and middle class girls were taught from a young age the skills they would need in order to keep a happy, healthy, peaceful home. While the outside world and working force were definitively male, the home was considered to be a feminine place. The outside world was evil and full of sin and wrongdoing, but the home was a moral haven (MacKethan). Husbands went to work in the corrupt world of industry, so they were meant to come home, decompress, and once again become attuned with their compassionate side. Muted colors and soft, ornate fabrics were in fashion for interior design and this was no accident. This style was meant to accentuate the calm and quiet atmosphere that was expected at home (“True Womanhood”). The woman was nothing more than just another beautiful accessory that every household was expected to have. A woman’s typical day differed based on her social standing. If she was rich, her family would employ servants so she would not have to perform as much of the cleaning and grunt work. Her children would be sent to school, husband to work, and once the expected duties were done a wife might have some leisure time. Acceptable activities were needlework, sewing, and other practical crafts She might also read the bible or books and magazines deemed appropriate for…show more content…
During the turn of the century they were still defined as mothers and wives and struggled to earn the right to vote. Even in the Roaring Twenties, once women had gained to right to vote and had more freedom over the way they dressed and behaved, the still could not have fulfilling careers. The fifties marked a time when the American family closely resembled the values of the Cult of Domesticity with the ideal aproned housewife and working husband. Even today women still struggle to be paid as much as men in the same positions and to be seen not just as mothers and daughters. Though the Cult of Domesticity is long gone, we still suffer from the ramifications of it and the society from which it was
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