Criminal Law: POL 303: The American Constitution

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Criminal Law Jared S. Browning POL 303: The American Constitution Prof. Andrew McAdams April 23, 2012 Criminal Law Every society has a standard set of rules that defines the conduct expected of its citizens. Certain behavior is not allowed because it may threaten, harm or damage the safety and welfare of the citizens; any violation of the set rules will result in punishment amongst those who chose to violate the rules. Criminal law is the body of law which relates to criminal activity; violating the rules or standards as previously described results in punishment. Those who chose to violate the law face the possibility of being apprehended and later incarcerated as a method of punishment for their criminal activity. Each member…show more content…
The initial step in criminal law is the investigation, then arrest, and then pretrial (Davenport, 2009). Once a criminal act has either been witnessed or enough information has been gathered pertaining to an individual who has committed a criminal offense the individual in many cases will be arrested. However, not all criminal offenses warrant an arrest; traffic violations for example in most cases do not require that an arrest be made, rather a citation or fine is given to the violator as an on the spot punishment. During the arrest the individual will be advised of his or her Miranda rights which purpose is designed to inform the individual of the constitutional rights he or she is entitled to (Davenport, 2009). Soon after the arrest the individual will face a judge for his or her pretrial arraignment. During this step in the process the individual may be granted bail, which temporarily releases him from police custody given he is present for all judicial hearings. The pretrial arraignment will be the first time the individual is formally/officially charged for the criminal act he…show more content…
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