Consequences Of The Progressive Era

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PROGRESSIVE ERA (1890-1920) I SOURCE OF PROGRESSIVE ERA The Progressive Era in the United States was a period of social activism and reform that flourished from the late 19th century to the early 20th century. The main goal of the Progressive movement was purification of government. Progressivism became an alternative to the traditional conservative response of the government to the social and economic issues. The cause of these issues and source of the progressive movement was essentially industrialization. Industrialization affected: Unemployment Waste of resources and pollution Abuse of corporate power Influx of immigrants These elements resulted in magnified problems of poverty, disease, crime corruption, and depression…show more content…
Most progressive educators believe that children learn as if they were scientists, following a process similar to John Dewey's model of learning: 1. Become aware of the problem. 2. Define the problem. 3. Propose hypotheses to solve it. 4. Evaluate the consequences of the hypotheses from one's past experience. 5. Test the likeliest solution. B. Jane Adams(1860-1935) was an educator and social worker in Chicago. She was the daughter of a politician and traveled extensively during her early years. She was exposed to the foul living and working conditions endured by the poor and developed a deep compassion and need to help alleviate their circumstances. In 1889 she founded Hull House as a social center where people could meet and learn new skills if they so desired. The Hull House complex provided space for the settlement's extensive social, educational, and artistic programs. C. W.E.B. DuBois (1868-1963) AND Booker T…show more content…
Basic academics like mathematics and literacy skills • DuBois: -Firm believer in excellence. -DuBois wanted African Americans encouraged to succeed in the arts and sciences. III IMMIGRANT EDUCATION Due to the large family size of the immigrant families most parents wanted to send children into the work force instead of school. These families wanted to benefit from the income they would receive if more of the family worked. This lead to the Compulsory Attendance and the Child Labor Laws. These laws were mandated by each individual state to ensure that the immigrant children were in school receiving an education and not working in
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