Comparing Orson Welles Que Viva Mexico And It's All True

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World in the Twentieth Century Spring 2013 Taking a story and displaying it into a film while trying to characterize different cultures and societies can be a challenge for most directors, but both Sergei Eisenstein and Orson Welles’ in Que Viva Mexico and It’s All True, do a brilliant job in portraying how society is in Mexico and Brazil. Both directors however had different motives. Welles was hired by the U.S. government to try and develop good foreign relations with Brazil while Eisenstein effort was to attempt to improve the film industry in Russia. Unfortunately both films were either shut down or uncompleted due to production complications but were finished later on. It’s All True, consisted of three different stories projecting the diversity in Latin American culture. The story that best presented the diversity of Brazilian culture was the last of the three, called…show more content…
Captivating a first-hand experience like the directors and converting it into a film is a great way of bringing diverse people closer to each other by having different societies around the world see what other countries and societies act like. Sergei Eisenstein and Orson Welles’ in Que Viva Mexico and It’s All True, take their understanding of Latin America and project it how it truly is. Welles worked with the U.S. government to try and develop good foreign relations with Brazil and took a very enthusiastic approach by trying to justify peace between the United States and Brazil while Eisenstein was more interested in actually learning about the Mexican culture and to attempt to improve the film industry in Russia. They both showed different religious ceremonies about the sacred way they honored their deceased. Although they were very different rituals, one they are related was that they exceedingly respected the process of death as if they all mended into a big

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