Compare the Methods Poets Use to Explore Ideas About Love in ‘Sonnet 116’ and in One Other Poem from Relationships

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Both poems generally give a positive overview of love; both poets suggest that love is never ending and can battle through bad situations. Shakespeare’s sonnet takes the form of argument, talking about the unchanging and eternal qualities of love whilst Browning’s sonnet is like a direct poem to her husband discussing the nature of her love for him. Shakespeare starts the poem by saying “let me not to the marriage of true minds” which sets the tone and exploration of true love. Browning starts by saying “how do I love thee? Let me count the ways!” She is suggesting that we can say that we love someone in many different ways. This is a bit like in the 8th line of Sonnet 116 when Shakespeare says “whose worth is unknown” suggesting that we will never know why we love someone so much. Both poets start by making the reader to reflect on the nature of love. Shakespeare then goes on to say “love is not love which alters when alteration finds” meaning that you can never lose love for someone because love doesn’t change and if it does, it was never real in the first place. This line reflects the subject of the poem that love is eternal. Browning however, goes on by using the internal rhyme of breadth and depth which gives the reader an impression that the love she has for her husband has increased further. In addition to that, breadth, depth and height echoes Ephesians III 17-19, where Saint Paul prays for comprehension of the length, breadth, depth, and height of Christ's love and the fullness of God. Browning then embarks on a religious idea of love “my soul can

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