Compare and contrast Mitch to the other men in A street car named desire?

592 Words3 Pages
Tennessee Williams a play A Streetcar Named Desire portrays men in different ways through the characters of Mitch, Stanley and Steve in the play. Mitch’s kindness is contrasted by the power driven Stanley and Steve. The character of Mitch is portrayed as a gentle man and is deliberately used to contrast the roughness of Stanley and Steve. When Mitch is introduced to Blanche we see his initial attachment and his caring nature. Mitch is particularly kind in scene three to Blanche when she “need kindness now”. Mitch is “a natural gentleman, one of the very few that are left in the world” as Blanche describes, throughout most of the play Mitch cares for Blanche and sees her as a possible wife. When Mitch finds out about Blanche’s promiscuous behaviour in Laurel he is very upset and hurt. Mitch is under the influence of Stanley and Steve violent behaviour. Mitch’s behaviour towards Blanche can be directly blamed on Stanley and Steve. In the final scene the audience sees Mitch as a courageous man when he acknowledges why Blanche is so damaged, Mitch identifies that Stanley has broken Blanche when he says “You done this”. Mitch’s true emotions come forth and Williams stage directions show that Mitch collapses at the table, sobbing. Throughout the play Mitch is seen as the alternative to the power driven alpha male like Stanley. Mitch’s kind character is also contrasted with the harsh character of Stanley. As the play progresses Stanley’s character becomes more transparent and we see what he is capable of in scene 10. Stanley is churlish and lacks wealth; he lacks moral values and takes the law into his own hands. Williams portrays Stanley like a beast, Blanche thinks of him “like an animal”. Williams also highlights his violent manner by stage directions, how Blanche has frightened look appears in her face and that Stanley says “STELLL-AHHHHH!” with heaven-splitting
Open Document