Closing The Gap In Australia

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“Sorry…mate?” As a bystander, it is outrageous to see how much effort the Australian government is putting into Aboriginal affairs even after Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s public apology to the Stolen Generations in 2008. It was necessary for the Australian government to acknowledge their past wrong-doings and apologise for the generation of stolen children whose families had been forcefully torn apart. Thinking back, this bleak moment in the Australian history was the result of an official government policy from 1909 to 1969 which allowed authorities such as the Aborigines Protection Board (APB) to remove children of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander backgrounds from their birth families. They were to be fostered or adopted into another…show more content…
In this, he said “[the] government first must take responsibility for addressing their past failures in Indigenous affairs […]” Note the reference to ‘past’ failures. What he failed to mention during that speech was a report released by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) which monitored the progress of ‘Closing the Gap’ until June 2009. The report found that there was a clear indication that ‘Closing the Gap’ was a failure. The biggest issue the government tried to deal with is the 17-year gap of life expectancy between Aboriginals and Non-Indigenous Australians. Sadly statistics have shown since the Rudd government came to power, only 44% of Aboriginals are considered to be in good health and this has not changed since 2002. Nowadays Aborigines are still facing problems such as low literacy rates, unemployment, health issues, etc. Regardless of all these difficulties, there is still one most important issue that the government has ignored for years and that issue is native sovereignty. Historically speaking, the Australian government has made very little pretence at recognising Aboriginal land…show more content…
Under the current curriculum, only 10% of Aboriginal children graduate year 12. There are many barriers to an Aboriginal students’ education and that includes: teaching materials are in English which makes it difficult for students’ whose first language is not English; poor teaching quality with more than 25% of surveyed Australian teachers feel that they need more professional development for Aboriginal education. In some situations, uneducated Aboriginal parents play a big role on influencing their children’s
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