Clinical Interview Self

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Clinical Interview Self I. Introduction Teachers are consequential to the students’ future as they help educate children on important topics and skills necessary for their following academic years being the basis for the students’ knowledge and success. What students are taught in school by their teachers will eventually guide them in their future endeavors. A teacher’s main goal is for the students to succeed and master the course material. If a student can successfully complete the necessary assessment with a ‘good’ grade, the teacher assumes it portrays a student’s mastery over a topic. However, a student’s success does not correlate to a student’s understanding. In Erlwanger (1973) article, he encountered a student named Benny who the…show more content…
It identifies any weaknesses in a student’s knowledge such as gaps and misconceptions the teacher would normally fail to notice. It will allow the teacher the ability to modify any lessons surrounding these misconceptions. It is very similar to a formative assessment since it allows the teacher to check on the student's progress and understanding. Through these interviews, the teacher can reduce misconceptions in the lessons and promote understanding of the curriculum which will help the student in their following academic…show more content…
It will be greatly beneficial for the teacher and the student as both parties will gain a greater awareness of the student’s understanding level through the student’s explanation. It is a very useful tool for formative assessment as the student and teacher are both monitoring the student’s progress. The teacher will be able to discover any of the student misconceptions and automatically implement methods in the next lessons to correct them and ensure a more stable foundation for further learning to developed upon in the future. However, as beneficial as the interviews are in gaining insight into the student’s minds, the interviews will take up too much classroom time. For the clinical interview to work, the teacher must interview every student in the classroom for 10-20 minutes each, which will take away precious class time from the teacher and students. It seems like a very unproductive way to use time and may force the students to fall behind schedule. Due to this possibility, teachers will often forgo clinical interviews and simply administer summative assessments to the students to test the students’ mastery. But, this method has its flaws too as students and teachers will focus more on the procedural aspects of the lesson. The teacher will simply regurgitate concepts to the students without checking for complete understanding or misconceptions. Most
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